When to expect your vacation

Do you know when you should accrue vacation and when, exactly, your accrual rate should increase?

 

Monthly Accrual

If you’re in a regular, benefited position, you’ve been accruing vacation once per month. But do you know when (i.e. in which pay period) you should be accruing vacation?

If you review a stack of your earnings statements, you should discover a pattern – that you’ve accrued vacation in the pay period that ends on or immediately after your benefit start date. For example, if your benefit start date was the 15th of the month, you will forever after accrue vacation in the pay period that ends on or after the 15th of every month.

The reason for this is simple – vacation is an earned benefit, which means you’re entitled to it only after you complete one month of work. However, as soon as you complete one month, you’re entitled to your vacation.

Accrual Increases

Your vacation accrual rate should increase after you complete 1, 4, and 9 years of service.  For example, if your benefit start date is December 15, your accrual rate should increase in the pay period that begins immediately after December 15 – 1, 4, and 9 years after your benefit start date.

The vacation accrual table that appears in our CBA (collective bargaining agreement) is somewhat ambiguous. Here is a modified version:

Length of Service Hours per Month Days per Month Days per Year
t ≤ 1 Year 6.67 0.83 10 Days
1 < t ≤ 4 10.00 1.25 15 Days
4 < t ≤ 9 13.33 1.67 20 Days
t > 9 Years 16.67 2.08 25 Days

Contractual language:

770 1. Vacation Accrual Rate.

 

All Regular Full-Time Employees with the applicable continuous years of service with the Employer shall accrue vacation hours on a monthly basis in accordance with the following schedule:

 

2012 – 2019 SEIU-UHW / Kaiser Collective Bargaining Agreement

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